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Surnames, Family Names

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  1. AA (ä): see van der Aa
  2. AAGESEN: Variant spelling of the Scandinavian surname Aageson, meaning "son of Aage."
  3. AAGESON (â´ge-son): Scandinavian surname meaning "son of Aage," a Danish personal name, now usually spelled Åge, meaning "father." Svend Aageson was a 12th century Scandinavian writer. Also spelled Aagesen.
  4. AARESTRUP (â´re-ströp): Danish surname, probably composed of a variant of Åre, from Old Norse ari "eagle," and þorp/þrop, "village," hence "eagle village."
  5. AARON (ãr´o̤n or ar´o̤n): English surname derived from the personal name Aaron, from Hebrew Aharon (Greek Aarōn), meaning "high mountain." 
  6. ABAELARD: German form of the French surname Abélard, via Latin Abaelardus, meaning "noble strength."

  7. ABAELARDUS: Latin form of the French surname Abélard, meaning "noble strength."
  8. ABAFI (o´bo-fē): Variant spelling of the Transylvanian royal patronymic surname Apafi, meaning "son of Appa," a Hungarian personal name meaning "father."
  9. ABAILARD: Variant spelling of the French surname Abélard, meaning "noble strength."
  10. ABAMONTI (ä-bä-mon´tē): Variant of the Spanish surname Albamonte, meaning "white mountain."
  11. ABANO (ä´bä-nō): Italian surname derived from the place name Abano, called by the Romans Aponus, a town in the province of Padua, Italy, famous for its healing hot springs, meaning "taking off the pain." Pietro d'Apono (also de Apono) was an Italian physician and philosopher who took his name from this town; he was denounced by the Inquisition as a magician.
  12. ABARBANEL: Variant of the Spanish-Jewish surname Abravanel, meaning "little Abraham," a personal name meaning "father of a multitude." Michael Gary Abarbanel is a retired minor league baseball pitcher.
  13. ABASALO (ä-bä-sä´lō): Variant form of the Basque surname Abasolo, meaning "priest-meadow." Mariano Abasalo was a Mexican-born soldier who joined the revolutionary movement of Hidalgo in 1810. He was captured and sent a prisoner to Spain where he died in confinement.
  14. ABASOLO: Basque surname composed of the elements abas "priest" and solo "meadow," hence "priest-meadow."
  15. ABBADIE (ä-bä-dē´): Shortened form of the French surname d'Abbadie, meaning "(of the) abbey."
  16. ABBAMONTE (ä-bä-mon´tē): Variant of the Spanish surname Albamonte, meaning "white mountain."
  17. ABBATE (ä-bä´te): Anglicized form of the Italian surname Dell'Abate, meaning "abbot, father, priest." Niccolo dell'Abate was an Italian painter who assisted in decorating the palace at Fontainebleau.
  18. ABBATTINI: Italian surname meaning "little priest." Compare with Abbatucci.
  19. ABBATUCCI (ä-bä-tü´sē): Italian patronymic surname meaning "descendant of a priest." Jacques Pierre Abbatucci was a Corsican partizan commander, an antagonist of Paoli and later a division general in the French service in Italy. Compare with Abbattini.
  20. ABBE (ab´i): English surname, meaning "priest." Cleveland Abbe was an American astronomer and meteorologist.
  21. ABBEY (ab´i): Variant spelling of the English surname Abbe, meaning "priest." Edwin Austin Abbey was an American painter and illustrator.
  22. ABBOT (ab´o̤t): Variant spelling of the English surname Abbott, meaning "abbot, father, priest."
  23. ABBOTT (ab´o̤t): English occupational surname meaning "abbot, father, priest," from Latin abbas "priest," from Greek abbas, from Aramaic aba "father." This name predates the Anglo-Saxons and is also common in Scotland. Also spelled Abbot.
  24. ABDALLAH (a̤bd-a̤l´a̤h): Arabic personal name and surname meaning "servant of God." Yasim ben Abdallah was an Arabian Mussulman, appointed by a sheik of Lamtouna to instruct a tribe of Berbers in the Atlas mountains in the faith of Islam. But the name is best remembered for being the name of Muhammad's father who was born at Mecca about 545, and died at Medina in 570. 
  25. ABEGG (ä´beg): German and Swiss topographic surname, composed of the elements ab "off" and egg/eck(e) "corner, promontory," hence "lives near the corner of a mountain." Julius Friedrich Heinrich Abegg, German jurist, and author of "Versuch einer Geschiehte der Preußischen Civil-Prozeß-Gesetzgebung."

  26. ABEGGLEN: Swabian German diminutive form of the surname Abegg, hence "little Abegg."

  27. ABEL (E. ā´be̤l, G. ä´bel): Anglo-Scottish and German surname derived from biblical Abel (Hebrew Hebel), meaning "vanity or vapor." Also spelled Abell.

  28. ABELA: Maltese form of the Catalan surname Abella, probably meaning "bee," denoting an active person, or "bee-keeper" if occupational.

  29. ABELARD (ab´e-lärd): Old German name, meaning "noble strength." 

  30. ABÉLARD (ä-bā-lär´): French form of the German surname Abelard, meaning "noble strength." Pierre Abelard, a noted French scholar.

  31. ABELARDO: Spanish name, derived from Latin Abelardus, meaning "noble strength."

  32. ABELARDUS (ab-e-lär´dus): Middle Latin form of the German surname Abelard, meaning "noble strength."

  33. ABELL: Variant spelling of the Anglo-Scottish surname Abel, meaning "vanity or vapor." Thomas Abell, a Roman Catholic clergyman, rector of Bradwell in Essex, and chaplain to Queen Catherine, wife of Henry VIII of England, unjustly condemned and executed at Smithfield on the charge of concealing the treasonable practices of Elizabeth Barton.

  34. ABELLA: Italian surname, probably derived from Latin apicula, meaning "bee." It may have originally been an occupational name for a bee-keeper, or a byname for a very active person. 
  35. ABENCERRAGES (a-ben´se-rāj-ez): The name of a Moorish family in Grenada, famous in Spanish romance, thought to possibly have been derived from the Semitic name Yussuf ben-Serragh, the name of the tribe in the time of Mohammed.
  36. ABENDROTH: German surname composed of the elements abend "evening" and roth "red," hence "red evening." 
  37. ABENEZRA (ä-ben-ez´rä̤): Variant of the Jewish patronymic surname Ibn Ezra, meaning "son of Ezra," a personal name meaning "help."
  38. ABERCROMBIE: This surname comes from the name of a parish in Fife, Scotland on the shore of the Frith of Forth, composed of the Gaelic elements aber "confluence of waters," and cruime/crombie "bend, crook." John Abercrombie (1780-1844), a Scottish physician and philosopher. Also spelled Abercromby.
  39. ABERCROMBY: Variant spelling of the Scottish surname Abercrombie, meaning "lives at the bend where the waters meet." Patrick Abercromby (1656-1716), a Scottish antiquary, author, physician, and historian.
  40. ABERDEEN: English surname derived from the city name Aberdeenshire, composed of the Gaelic elements aber "the mouth of a river," "marshy ground," or "place where streams meet," and the name of the river Don, hence "from the mouth of the river Don.
  41. ABERDENE: Variant spelling of the English surname Aberdeen, meaning "from the mouth of the river Don."
  42. ABERNETHY: Scottish surname derived from the name of a town in Strathern, Scotland, composed of the Gaelic elements aber "confluence of waters," and nethy "dangerous," hence "from the dangerous place where the waters meet." Abernety was anciently a seat of Culdee worship and a Pictish royal residence. John Abernethy (1680-1740), a clergyman of the Irish Presbyterian Church, appointed by the synod to the church in Dublin, 1717. His refusal to obey caused a schism in the Irish Church.
  43. ABERNITHY: Variant spelling of Gaelic Abernethy, meaning "from the dangerous place where the waters meet."
  44. ABERT: German surname of which the first element is uncertain, the second coming from beort "bright, famous." It may from a form of Albrecht, meaning "very distinguished." Joseph Johann Abert (1832-1915), a German musician and composer of operas.
  45. ABILDGAARD (ä-bil´gârd): Danish surname derived from the vocabulary word abildgaard, Icelandic epla-garðr, meaning "apple-yard, apple orchard." Nikolai Abraham Abildgaard (1744-1809), a Danish painter of Norwegian parentage, professor and later director at the academy of Copenhagen.
  46. ABNEY: English form of the French surname d'Aubigny, meaning "from Aubigny," a Norman city which got its name from Latin Albinius, meaning "like Albus," i.e. "white." Thomas Abney (1640-1722), a London merchant, sheriff of London and Middlesex 1693-94, one of the original directors of the Bank of England, and Lord Mayor of London, 1700-01.
  47. ABOAB (ä-bō´äb): Spanish-Jewish name, which may have derived from Abuhib, which may be a Castilian pronunciation of Arabic Abdelwahab, meaning "servant of Wahab," a personal name meaning "generous." Isaac Aboab, a Hebrew scholar who flourished at Toledo about 1300, was the author of "Shulchan hapanim" (table of show bread), which is lost, and of "Menorath hamaor" (the light), a collection of legends made from an ethical and religious point of view.
  48. ABRAHAM: This surname comes from the Hebrew personal name Abraham, meaning "father of a multitude." 
  49. ABRABANEL (אַבְּרַבַּנְאֵל, ä-brä-bä-nel´): Variant of the Spanish-Jewish surname Abravanel, meaning "little Abraham," a personal name meaning "father of a multitude." Isaac Abrabanel (1437-1508), was a Jewish scholar and statesman. His family claimed descent from the royal house of David.
  50. ABRAVANEL (אַבְּרַבַּנְאֵל, ä-brä-bä-nel´): Spanish-Jewish surname, derived from either a byname or hypocoristic form (child's pronunciation) of the given name Abraham, with the added Spanish diminutive suffix -el, hence "little Abraham," a personal name meaning "father of a multitude." Judah Leon Abravanel (1465-1523), was a Jewish Portuguese physician, philosopher and poet. Also spelled Abarbanel and Abrabanel.
  51. ACHESON: Variant form of English Atkinson, meaning "son of Adam." William Arthur gives it a Cornish British origin, and the meaning "inscription or memorial."
  52. ACKART: Old English surname composed of the elements ack "oak" and ard "disposition, nature," hence "oak-like," i.e. firm-hearted, unyielding.
  53. ACKERMAN: Old English surname composed of the elements acker "made of oak; oaken," and man "man," hence "oaken man," i.e. a hard, unyielding man.
  54. ACKERLEY: English surname meaning "oak meadow." 
  55. ACKERS: Old English surname of uncertain etymology. The first element is from Old English ack "oak." The termination -er in many nouns has the same signification as Latin vir "man." The name probably means either "place of oaks" or "oak-man." 
  56. ACKLAND: Old English surname derived from the name of a place in North Devonshire England, composed of the elements ack "oak" and land "land," hence "oak land."
  57. ACKMAN: Old English name composed of the elements ack "oak" and man "man," hence "oak man."
  58. ACKSHEUGH: Old English surname meaning "hilly land covered with oaks."
  59. ACTON: Old English surname derived from the name of a town in Middlesex England, meaning "oak tree settlement." 
  60. ADAIR: Variant spelling of the Scottish surname Adaire, of Irish origin, meaning "the ford of the oaks."
  61. ADAIRE: Scottish surname derived from the Irish place name Athdare, composed of the elements ath "a ford" and dare (from darach) "oak," hence "the ford of the oaks." There is a tradition concerning the origin of this name recorded in William Arthur's Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names, 1857; it reads: "Thomas, the sixth Earl of Desmond, while on a hunting excursion was benighted, and lost his way, between Tralee and Newcastle, in the county of Limerick, where he was received and hospitably entertained by one William McCormic, whose daughter he subsequently married. At this alliance, the family and clan took umbrage. Resigning his title and estate to his youngest brother, he fled to France in 1418, and died of grief at Rouen, two years afterward. The King of England attended his funeral. He had issue, Maurice and John; Robert, the son of Maurice, returning to Ireland, with the hope of regaining the estates and title of Thomas, his ancestor, slew Gerald, the White Knight, in single combat at Athdare, the ford of the oaks, whence he received the name of Adaire. He embarked for Scotland, where he married Arabella, daughter of John Campbell, Lord of Argyle." 
  62. ADAMS: Scottish surname of Hebrew origin, meaning "son of Adam ("red earth")." This name is of great antiquity in Scotland. "Duncan Adam, son of Alexander Adam, lived in the reign of King Robert Bruce, and had four sons, from whom all the Adams, Adamsons, and Adies in Scotland are descended." -- William Arthur, M.A., An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names, 1857.
  63. ADAMSON: Scottish surname meaning "son of Adam."
  64. ADCOCK: Scottish surname meaning "little Ad (Adam)."
  65. ADDISON
    1. Old English surname, meaning "son of Adam." 
    2. Scottish surname meaning "son of Adam." In Lowland-Scotch, Adie or Adee is a corruption of Adam.
  66. ADEE: English surname derived from Hebrew Adam, meaning "the red earth."
  67. ADKINS: English surname composed of Ad (Adam) and kins from German kind "child," hence "child of Adam."
  68. ADLAM: Old English surname composed of the elements adel "noble" and ham "castle, village," hence "noble village."
  69. ADLAR: Dutch surname derived from the word adelaar, meaning "eagle."
  70. ADNET: Originally a medieval French form of Hebrew Adam, meaning "the red earth."
  71. ADNOT: Originally a medieval French form of Hebrew Adam, meaning "the red earth."
  72. ADRIAN: English surname derived from Latin Adrianus, meaning "from Hadria." Also spelled Hadrian.
  73. AFFLECK: English altered form of the Scottish surname Auchinleck, meaning "hill stone," once born by the proprietors of the lands and barony of Auchinleck, in Angusshire, Scotland.
  74. AFTON: Old English surname, derived from the name of the River Afton in Ayrshire, Scotland, made famous in Burns' poem "Sweet Afton." 
  75. AGAN: Scottish surname derived from Gaelic eigin, meaning "force, violence," hence "strong-handed." 
  76. AGAR: Scottish surname derived from Gaelic aighear, meaning "gladness, joy."
  77. AGLIONBY: English surname derived from the name of a village in Cumbria, England, which is of Norman French origin, composed of the elements aglion "eaglet" and by "habitation, residence," hence "eagle's nest."
  78. AGNEW: English surname of Norman French origin, derived from the name of the town Agneau in Normandy, meaning "lamb."
  79. AHERN: Irish Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó hEachthighearna "descendant of Eachthighearna," hence "lord of horses."
  80. AIKEN: Anglo-Saxon surname meaning "made of oak."
  81. AINSLEY: Scottish habitational surname, composed of the Old English elements ansetl "hermitage" and leah "meadow, pasture," hence "hermitage meadow."
  82. AINSWORTH: British and Welsh surname, composed of the elements ains "spring, river" and gwerth "court, place, possession," hence "place or possession on the river."
  83. AIRD: Scottish surname, derived from the name of any of a number of places in Scotland, derived from Gaelic aird, meaning "height, promontory."
  84. AITKIN: Perhaps a variant form of the English surname Atkins, meaning either "son of Adam" or "son of Arthur."
  85. AITON: Variant form of the Old English surname Eaton, meaning "water town." 
  86. AKEMAN: Variant spelling of the Old English surname Ackman, meaning "oak man."
  87. AKERS: Variant spelling of the Old English surname Ackers, probably meaning either "place of oaks" or "oak-man." 
  88. AKIN: Variant spelling of the Anglo-Saxon surname Aiken, meaning "made of oak."
  89. ALAN: English surname derived from the Old Celtic name Alan, which may have the same origin as Irish Gaelic Ailín, from ailín, a diminutive of ail "rock," hence "little rock." Other possibilities include 1) from Slavonic aland "wolf-dog," 2) from a corruption of Latin Ælianus "sun," or "sun-bright," or 3) from Gaelic aluinn "handsome." Other forms of the name include Allan, Allen, Allin, Alleyne.
  90. ALANSON: Scottish surname meaning "son of Alan."
  91. ALBAMONTE (äl-bä-mon´te): Spanish surname, composed of the Latin elements alba "white" and monte "mountain," hence "white mountain." Giuseppe Albamonte was a Neapolitan statesman, secretary-general under the Cisalpine Republic, 1798, and member of the executive committee at Naples. Also spelled Abbamonte, Abamonte, Abamonti, and Albamonti.
  92. ALBERT: English surname derived from the Middle English personal name Albert, from Latin Albertus, from Old High German Albrecht, meaning "very distinguished."

  93. ALCOCK: English surname composed of Al (in this case a pet form of Henry) and the diminutive suffix -cock, hence "little Al (Henry)."

  94. ALDAINE: Variant form of the Old English surname Alden, meaning "high castle" or "high town."

  95. ALDEN: Old English surname composed of the elements ald "old" and den "hill," hence "old hill." Or from alt "high" and dun "castle, town," hence "high castle" or "high town." Also spelled Aldaine.

  96. ALDERSEY: Old English surname meaning "isle of alders."

  97. ALDIS: Modern form of the Old English surname Aldous, possibly meaning "from the old house."

  98. ALDJOY: English surname meaning either "old joy" or "all joy."

  99. ALDOUS: From a surname common in the Middle Ages, thought to be of Anglo-Saxon origin, probably a contraction of Old English ald-house, hence "from the old house." 

  100. ALDRED: Middle English form of Anglo-Saxon Ealdred, meaning "old counsel." William Arthur gives this surname the meaning "all-dread."

  101. ALDRIDGE: English surname of disputed derivation. It may come from the personal name Aldrich, meaning "noble ruler," or it may be an altered form of the surname Aldred, meaning "old counsel" or "all-dread."

  102. ALEXANDER: English surname derived from the personal name Alexander, meaning "defender of mankind." 

  103. ALFIERI: Italian surname, derived from Spanish alférez, meaning "standard bearer." The Spanish word, alférez, was borrowed from Arabic al-fris, meaning "mounted fighter" or "knight," but the original meaning was not retained.
  104. ALFORD: Old English habitational surname, derived from the name of various places most of which were composed of the Old English elements eald "old" and ford "ford," hence "old river-ford." 
  105. ALFORT: English surname derived from the name of a village in France near Paris.
  106. ALFRED: English surname derived from the personal name Alfred, meaning "elf counsel."
  107. ALGAR: English surname of Gaelic origin, meaning "noble."
  108. ALLENDORF: English surname derived from the name of a town in Hesse, Germany, meaning "old town."
  109. ALLGOOD: Old English surname meaning "all good."
  110. ALSOP: English surname derived from then name of a town in the county of Derby, England. It probably comes from the occupational name Ale-shop, a name given to the keeper of an ale-shop.
  111. ALTON: Old English surname, derived from the name of many places most of which meant either "old town" or "settlement at the (river) source."
  112. ALVERSTON: Variant spelling of the English surname Alverton, meaning "high green hill."
  113. ALVERTON: English surname composed of the elements al "high," ver "green" and ton "hill," hence "high green hill."
  114. ALVIN: English surname derived from the Norman French personal name Aluin, from Old High German Alwin, meaning "all-winner." 
  115. ALVISIO: Italian surname, derived ultimately from Germanic Hlodovic, thus sharing the same etymology as French Louis, meaning "famous warrior."
  116. ALVORD: Variant spelling of the English surname Alford, meaning "old river-ford."
  117. ALWIN: Variant spelling of the English surname Alvin, meaning "all-winner."

  118. AMAKER: English surname derived from the name of a Danish island Amager, located east of Copenhagen.

  119. AMBLER: English form of the French occupational surname Amblour, from Ambleur, the name for an officer of the king's stables.

  120. AMBLOUR: French occupational surname derived from Ambleur, the name for an officer of the king's stables. Ambler is the Anglicized form.

  121. AMBROSE: English surname derived from the personal name Ambrose, meaning "immortal."

  122. AMERY: Variant spelling of the English surname Amory, meaning "home-ruler." 

  123. AMES: English surname of uncertain derivation, possibly a contracted form of Ambrose, meaning "immortal," or from Amos, meaning "strong."

  124. AMHERST: Old English surname composed of the elements ham "town, village" and hurst/herst "wood," hence "town in the wood."

  125. AMHLAOIBH: Irish Gaelic surname, possibly derived from Scandinavian Anlaf (O.N. Ánleifr), meaning "heir of the ancestors."

  126. AMMADON: English surname derived from Gaelic amadan, meaning "numskull, simpleton."

  127. AMORY: English surname, derived from the Norman French personal name Aimeri, meaning "home-ruler." 
  128. AMPTE: Dutch surname derived from Ampt, an official situation; the house in which an officer transacts his business; a lordship of the Netherlands.
  129. ANDARTON: English habitational surname composed of the elements an "the," dar "oak" and ton "hill," hence "the oak hill."
  130. ANDERSON: English patronymic surname meaning "son of Andrew."
  131. ANDREW: English surname derived from the personal name Andrew, meaning "man; warrior." 
  132. ANGEVINE: French surname derived from the ethnic byname Angevine, denoting a person coming originally "from Anjou" in France.
  133. ANGUS: English surname derived from the name of a county of Scotland, which took its name from Gaelic Aonghus (supposedly from Aongus Fer), meaning "excellent valor." 
  134. ANNAKIN: Low German surname derived from Hebrew Channah (English Hannah), meaning "favor; grace." 
  135. ANNAN: English surname derived from Annon, the name of a river of Scotland, perhaps from Gaelic an-oun, meaning "slow running water" or "gentle river."
  136. ANNESLEY: English name derived from the name of a town in Nottinghamshire, England, possibly named after Anclo, a city in Norway, by free-booters or conquerors of Briton. 
  137. ANSCOM: English surname meaning "stone-enclosed valley." 
  138. ANSELL: French surname, derived from the personal name Ansel, meaning "divine helmet."
  139. ANSELM: German surname derived from the personal name Anselm, meaning "divine helmet."
  140. ANSON: English patronymic surname which may have been based on any of a number of Middle English names, i.e. "son of Ansel" or "son Agnes."
  141. ANSTRUTHER: English surname of Celtic origin, derived from Gaelic Anstruth, composed of the elements aon "excellent" and sruth "discerning, knowing," and -er from fear "man," hence "excellent discerning man." Anstruth is the name of an ancient Celtic order of bards next in rank to the Allamh, or chief doctor of the seven degrees in all the sciences.
  142. ANTHON: Contracted form of the English surname Anthony, possibly meaning "invaluable." 
  143. ANTHONY: English surname derived from the personal name Anthony, possibly meaning "invaluable." 
  144. AP LLOYD: Welsh surname meaning "son of Lloyd," a personal name meaning "grey-haired."
  145. APAFI (o´po-fē): Transylvanian royal patronymic surname, composed of the Hungarian secular personal name Appa "father" and fi "son," hence "son of Appa." 
  146. APONUS: Latin form of Italian Abano, meaning "taking off the pain." Petrus Aponus, physician and philosopher.
  147. APPLEBY: English surname derived from the name of a town in Westmoreland, England, meaning "apple town."
  148. APPLEGARTH: English surname meaning "apple orchard" or "apple garden."
  149. APPLETON: English surname meaning "apple town."
  150. ARBLASTER: English surname derived from Latin Balistarius, meaning "cross-bowman."
  151. ARBUTHNOT: English surname derived from the name of city in Mearns, Scotland, originally written Aberbuthnoth, composed of the elements aber "the mouth of a river," "marshy ground," or "place where streams meet," both "dwelling," and neth, a descending stream, or low stream," hence "dwelling near the confluence of the river with the sea."
  152. ARCHER: English occupational surname, derived from Old French archier, from Latin arcuarius "bow," hence "bowman" or "maker of bows."
  153. ARCHIBALD: English surname of derived from German Archimbald, via Norman French Archimbaud, meaning "genuine courage." The Scottish Gaelic form is Gilleasbaig, Anglicized as Gillespie, and means "bishop's servant."

  154. ARDAL: English surname derived from an Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Árdghal, meaning "high valor."

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