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Male "C" Names

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  1. CLAUDIOS: Dutch form of Latin Claudius, meaning "lame."
  2. CLAUDIU: Romanian form of Greek Klaudios, meaning "lame."
  3. CLAUDIUS: Roman family name derived from Latin claudus, meaning "lame."
  4. CLAUS: Short form of German Niclaus, meaning "victor of the people." 
  5. CLAVILENO: Spanish name meaning "wooden-pin wing-bearer." This is the name of the wooden horse Don Quixote and Sancho Panza mounted to achieve the liberation of Dolori'da and her companions. 
  6. CLAY: Short form of English Clayton, meaning "clay settlement."
  7. CLAYTON: English habitational surname transferred to forename use, composed of the Old English elements cl�g "clay" and tun "enclosure, settlement," hence "clay settlement."
  8. CLEDAUCUS: Latin name of a legendary king of the Britons who was preceded by Eliud and succeeded by Clotenus. Meaning unknown.
  9. CLEDWYN: Welsh name composed of the elements caled "hard, rough" and (g)wyn "fair, holy, white," hence "hardy and fair."
  10. CLEISTHENES: Latin form of Greek Kleisthenes, meaning "glorious strength."
  11. CLEM: English short form of Latin Clement, meaning "gentle and merciful."
  12. CLEMENS: Late Latin name meaning "gentle and merciful."
  13. CLÉMENT: French form of Latin Clement, meaning "gentle and merciful."
  14. CLEMENT: Short form of Latin Clementius, meaning "gentle and merciful." meaning "gentle and merciful." In the bible, this is the name of a companion of Paul.
  15. CLEMENTS: English surname transferred to forename use, derived from Latin Clemens or Clement, meaning "gentle and merciful."
  16. CLEMENTE: Italian, Portuguese and Spanish form of Latin Clementius, meaning "gentle and merciful."
  17. CLEMENTINUS: Latin name meaning "of Clementius."
  18. CLEMENTIUS: Latin name meaning "gentle and merciful."
  19. CLEMMIE: Pet form of English Clem, meaning "gentle and merciful."
  20. CLEOPAS: Latin form of Greek Kleopas, meaning "glory of the father." In the New Testament bible, this is the name of a disciple.
  21. CLEOPATROS: Latin form of Greek Kleopatros, meaning "glory of the father."
  22. CLEOPHAS: Latin form of Greek Kleophas, meaning "glory of the father." In the bible, this is the name of two disciples to whom the risen Jesus appeared at Emmaus.
  23. CLETES: Pet form of Latin Anacletus, meaning "called back; invoked."
  24. CLETIS: Variant spelling of Latin Cletus, meaning famous, renowned." 
  25. CLETO: Short form of Italian/Spanish Anacleto, meaning "called back, invoked."
  26. CLETUS: Latin form of Greek Kleitos, meaning famous, renowned." 
  27. CLEVE: Short form of English Cleveland, meaning "sloped land." 
  28. CLEVELAND: English surname transferred to forename use, composed of the Old English elements clif "cliff, bank, slope," and land "land," hence "sloped land."
  29. CLIAMAIN: Scottish Gaelic form of Latin Clementius, meaning "gentle and merciful."
  30. CLIFF: Originally a short form of English Clifford ("cliff river crossing)", this name became an independent name, meaning simply "cliff."
  31. CLIFFORD: English surname transferred to forename use, composed of the Old English elements clif "cliff, bank, slope" and ford "ford," hence "cliff river crossing."
  32. CLIFTON: English surname transferred to forename use, composed of the Old English elements clif "cliff, bank, slope" and tun "enclosure, settlement," hence "cliff settlement."
  33. CLÍMACO: Spanish form of Latin Climacus, meaning "ladder."
  34. CLIMACUS: Latin name derived from the Greek word klimax, meaning "ladder."
  35. CLINT: Short form of English Clinton, meaning "settlement near the headland." 
  36. CLINTON: English surname transferred to forename use, meaning "settlement near the headland." 
  37. CLITUS: Latin form of Greek Kleitos, meaning famous, renowned." 
  38. CLIVE: English surname transferred to forename use, from the name of various places, derived from Old English clif, meaning "bank, cliff, slope."
  39. CLOPAS: Latin form of Greek Klopas, probably meaning "my exchanges." In the bible, this is the name of the father of the apostle James the less. 
  40. CLOPHAS: Contracted form of Latin Cleophas, meaning "glory of the father."
  41. CLOTAIRE: French form of Latin Chlotharius, meaning "loud warrior."
  42. CLOTENUS: Latin name of a legendary king of the Britons who was preceded by Cledaucus and succeeded by Gurgintius. Meaning unknown.
  43. CLOVIS: French form of German Hlodovic, meaning "famous warrior."
  44. CLYDE: English name derived from the name of the Scottish river Cledwyn, of uncertain origin, but probably having a similar etymology to Irish Clodagh, meaning "muddy."
  45. CNÁMHÍN: Irish Gaelic byname for a skinny man, meaning "little bone."
  46. CNUT: Variant spelling of Scandinavian Knut, meaning "knot." 
  47. COATL: Nahuatl name meaning "snake."
  48. COAXOCH: Nahuatl name meaning "serpent flower."
  49. COBUS: Short form of Dutch Jacobus, meaning "supplanter."
  50. COBY: Dutch unisex short form of Jacoba and Jacobus, both meaning "supplanter."
  51. COCIDIUS: Myth name of a Celtic hunter god, possibly meaning "of the woods."
  52. CODIE: Variant spelling of English unisex Cody, meaning "helper."
  53. CODY: Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from a variant spelling of the surname Cuddihy (also spelled Cuddy), an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cuidighthigh "descendant of Cuidightheach," hence "helper."
  54. COEMGEN: Old Irish name composed of Gaelic caomh "comely" and a diminutive suffix, hence "little comely one." 
  55. COILEÁN: Irish form of Scottish Gaelic Cailean, meaning "whelp; young pup."
  56. COINÍN: Old Gaelic byname composed of the word cano "wolf" and a diminutive suffix, hence "little wolf."
  57. COINNEACH: Variant form of Gaelic Cainneach, meaning "comely; finely made."
  58. CÒISEAM: Scottish Gaelic form of Roman Latin Constantine, meaning "steadfast."
  59. COLA: Anglo-Saxon equivalent of Old Norse Kolr, a byname for a dark, swarthy person, meaning "black, coal."
  60. COLAN: Cornish form of Irish Gaelic Coileán, meaning "whelp, young pup."
  61. COLBERT: English surname transferred to forename use, from the French form of German Kolbert, a variant of Kölber, an occupational name for a "maker of wooden clubs" and later an "armor-maker," from Middle High German kolbe, meaning "cudgel, club." 
  62. COLBY: English surname transferred to forename use, composed of the Old Norse elements kolr "black, coal" and býr "settlement," hence "coal settlement."
  63. COLE: English surname transferred to forename use, derived from Old English Cola, meaning "black, coal." This name is also sometimes used as a pet form of Nicholas, meaning "victor of the people."
  64. COLEMAN: Middle English contracted form of Latin Columbanus, meaning "dove."
  65. COLIN
    1. Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Cailean, meaning "whelp; young pup."
    2. Diminutive form of English Nicholas, meaning "victor of the people." 
  66. COLLIN: Variant spelling of English Colin, meaning "whelp; young pup."
  67. COLM
    1. Old Irish form of Latin Columba, meaning "dove."
    2. Short form of English Malcolm, meaning "devotee of St. Columb." 
  68. COLMÁN: Irish form of Latin Columbanus, meaning "dove."
  69. COLMAN: English form of Irish Colmán, meaning "dove."
  70. COLOMBAIN: French form of Latin Columbanus, meaning "dove."
  71. COLOMBANO: Italian form of Latin Columbanus, meaning "dove."
  72. COLOMBE: French unisex form of Latin Columba, meaning "dove."
  73. COLOMBO: Italian form of Latin Columba, meaning "dove."
  74. COLT: English name derived from the vocabulary word colt, from Old English colt, which originally meant "young ass" or "young camel."
  75. COLTEN: Variant spelling of English Colton, meaning "Cola's settlement."
  76. COLTON: English surname transferred to forename use, derived from a place name composed of the Old English personal name Cola and the word tun "enclosure, settlement," hence "Cola's settlement."
  77. COLUM: Irish form of Latin Columba, meaning "dove."
  78. COLUMB: Scottish form of Latin Columba, meaning "dove."
  79. COLUMBA: Latin name meaning "dove."
  80. COLUMBAN: Short form of Latin Columbanus, meaning "dove."
  81. COLUMBANUS: Elaborated form of Latin Columba, meaning "dove."
  82. COLUMBUS: Latin name meaning "dove."
  83. CÔME: French form of Latin Cosmo, meaning "order, beauty."
  84. COMGAL: Contracted form of Irish Gaelic Comhghall, meaning "joint pledge."
  85. COMGAN: Contracted form of Irish Gaelic Comhghán, meaning "born together."
  86. COMHGHALL: Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements comh "joint, together" and gall "pledge," hence "joint pledge."
  87. COMHGHÁN: Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements comh "joint, together" and gan-/gen- "born," hence "born together."
  88. COMHNALL: Scottish form of Irish Gaelic Conall, meaning "hound of valor."
  89. COMYN: Irish name meaning "shrewd."
  90. CONALL: Traditional Irish name composed of the Gaelic elements (genitive con) "hound" and gal "valor," hence "hound of valor." This is the name of the legendary Ulster hero who avenged Cúchulainn's death.
  91. CONALLAN: Diminutive form of Irish Gaelic Conall, meaning "little hound of valor."
  92. CÓNÁN: Irish Gaelic name which was originally a byname derived from a diminutive form of "hound," hence "little hound."
  93. CONAN: Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Cónán, meaning "little hound."
  94. CONCETTO: Masculine form of Italian Concetta, meaning "conception."
  95. CONCHOBAR: Irish legend name of a king of Ulster said to have lived at the time of Christ, meaning "hound-lover."
  96. CONCHOBHAR: Variant spelling of Irish Conchobar, meaning "hound-lover."
  97. CONCHOBOR: Variant spelling of Irish Conchobar, meaning "hound-lover."
  98. CONCHOBUR: Variant spelling of Irish Conchobar, meaning "hound-lover."
  99. CONCHUBHAR: Variant spelling of Irish Conchobar, meaning "hound-lover."
  100. CONCHÚIR: Variant form of Irish Conchobar, meaning "hound-lover."
  101. CONCHÚR: Variant form of Irish Conchobar, meaning "hound-lover."
  102. CONFUCIUS: Anglicized form of Chinese Kong Fu Zi. Kong is the surname, meaning "hole" or "opening." Fu is the generation name, meaning "husband, master, man," and Zi is the given name, meaning "son."
  103. CÔNG: Vietnamese name meaning "skillful; industrious."
  104. CONLÁED: Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Conlaodh, meaning "purifying fire."
  105. CONLAOCH: Irish name, composed of the Gaelic elements con "hound" and laoch "warrior," hence "hound warrior." In Irish legend, this is the name of a son of Cúchulainn. He was accidentally killed by his father.
  106. CONLAODH: Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements connla "pure, chaste" and aodh "fire," hence "purifying fire."
  107. CONLETH: Modern form of Irish Gaelic Conláed, meaning "purifying fire."
  108. CONLEY: Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Conláed, meaning "purifying fire."
  109. CONN: Old Irish name derived from Gaelic conn, having several possible meanings including "chief, freeman, head, hound, intelligence, strength."
  110. CONNELL: Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Conall, meaning "hound of valor."
  111. CONNER: Variant spelling of English Connor, meaning "hound-lover."
  112. CONNLA: Variant spelling of Irish Conlaoch, meaning "hound warrior."
  113. CONNOR: Anglicized form of Irish Conchobhar, meaning "hound-lover."
  114. CONOR: Variant spelling of English Connor, meaning "hound-lover."
  115. CONRAD: Variant spelling of German Konrad, meaning "bold counsel." In use by the English.
  116. CONRADO: Spanish form of German Conrad, meaning "bold counsel."
  117. CONRÍ: Gaelic name composed of the elements conn "chief, head, hound" and ri "king," hence "chief-king" or "hound-king."
  118. CONSTANS: Latin name meaning "steadfast."
  119. CONSTANT: From Latin Constans, meaning "steadfast." 
  120. CONSTANTIJN: Dutch form of Latin Constantinus, meaning "steadfast."
  121. CONSTANTIN: French and Romanian form of Latin Constantinus, meaning "steadfast."
  122. CONSTANTINE
    1. Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Conn, having several possible meanings including "chief, freeman, head, hound, intelligence, strength." In Arthurian legend, this is the name of the successor to King Arthur. He was the son of Cador of Cornwall who fought in the Battle of Camlann and was one of the few survivors. Just before Arthur was taken to Avalon, Cador passed the crown onto his son, Constantine.
    2. Medieval form of Roman Latin Constantinus, meaning "steadfast."
  123. CONSTANTINUS: Roman name derived from the Latin word constans, meaning "steadfast."
  124. CONSTANTIUS: A derivative of Latin Constans, meaning "steadfast." 
  125. CONSUS: Roman name, probably of Etruscan or Sabine origin, meaning "to sow." In mythology, this is the name of a god of grains and subterranean silos. 
  126. CONWAY: Irish surname transferred to forename use, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Conbhuide "descendant of Cú Bhuidhe," hence "yellow hound."
  127. COOPER: English occupational surname transferred to forename use, from Dutch kuper, from kup "tub; container," which in English became coop. A cooper was a maker and/or fixer of vessels such as buckets and barrels.
  128. COOS: Dutch pet form of Latin Jacobus, meaning "supplanter."
  129. CORANN: Celtic myth name of a magical Druid, meaning "crown."
  130. CORBIN: From an Old French and Middle English byname composed of the word corb, "crow, raven," and a diminutive suffix, hence "little crow" or "little raven."
  131. CORDELL: English occupational surname transferred to forename use, from a diminutive form of Old French corde, "rope," hence "little roper." The occupation consisted of making strings, cords, ropes, etc.
  132. CORENTIN: Old Breton name, probably meaning "hurricane, tempest." 
  133. COREY: English name, possibly of Irish Gaelic origin, from a place name meaning "deep hollow, ravine."
  134. CORI: Variant spelling of English Corey, possibly meaning "deep hollow, ravine."
  135. CORIE: Variant spelling of English Corey, possibly meaning "deep hollow, ravine."
  136. CORIN
    1. Cornish legend name of a hero who was a slayer of giants, probably derived from the first element of the Old English tribal name Cornwealas, from the ethnic term Kernow, meaning "Cornish" or "horned." 
    2. French form of Roman Latin Quirinus, meaning "men together."
  137. CORMAC: Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements corb "defilement" and mac "son," hence "son of defilement."
  138. CORMAG: Scottish form of Irish Gaelic Cormac, meaning "son of defilement."
  139. CORNEILLE: French form of Latin Cornelius, meaning "of a horn."
  140. CORNEL: Romanian form of Greek Kornelios, meaning "of a horn."
  141. CORNÉLIO: Portuguese form of Latin Cornelius, meaning "of a horn."
  142. CORNELIS: Dutch form of Latin Cornelius, meaning "of a horn."
  143. CORNELIU: Romanian form of Greek Kornelios, meaning "of a horn."
  144. CORNELIUS
    1. Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Conn, having several possible meanings including "chief, freeman, head, hound, intelligence, strength."
    2. Latin name derived from the word cornu ("horn"), hence "of a horn." In the bible, this is the name of a Roman centurion who converted to Christianity.
  145. CORNELL: Medieval form of Roman Latin Cornelius, meaning "of a horn."
  146. CORRADO: Italian form of German Conrad, meaning "bold counsel."
  147. CORT: Variant spelling of Dutch Kort, meaning "bold counsel."
  148. CORTNEY: Variant spelling of English unisex Courtney, meaning "short nose."
  149. CORY: Variant spelling of English Corey, possibly meaning "deep hollow, ravine."
  150. COSIMO: Italian form of Latin Cosmo, meaning "order, beauty."

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